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Life at the end of the Trail

To the friends, family, and colleagues who helped make the launch of this website a success, thank you. We had a big first few days, even before the search engines caught on. That being said, I probably shouldn’t have launched the thing right before a weeklong trip to the Pacific Northwest. Apologies for the quiet time. Let me make it up to you with some photos:

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[Clickworthy] Is your church too cool?

We have one place for the uncool people—our ministries—and another place for the cool people—our church services. When we actually bump into one another, things can get ‘awkward,’ so we try to avoid it.

Rachel Held Evans explains why she longs for the traditional “uncool” church in a brief feature for Relevant Magazine that hit their website Wednesday. While I certainly think it is possible for a church to market itself and not lose its way, her story shows us how quickly branding and image can supercede the mission.

Read more from Evans on her blog. This clickworthy article was spotted on Jonny Diaz’s Twitter feed. Follow him. He’s entertaining. And his brother is a major league baseball player.


See something in the news that you think is Clickworthy? Email Dylan.

[Clickworthy] Once again athletes, think before you tweet

If twitter were a loaded gun, no telling how many athletes would have shot themselves in the foot – or worse.

A great piece in this morning’s (Jackson, Miss.) Clarion Ledger by legendary sports columnist Rick Cleveland on the hazards of 140-character public statements by (particularly) college athletes. Included are eight maxims of Tweeting that everyone should be aware of, but so few seem to be (I’m looking at you, Mr. Weiner).

C.J. Johnson, a 5-star recruit heading to Ole Miss in the fall, was the latest public figure to not realize that he was one. SportsbyBrooks preserved a host of obscene tweets, many of them denigrating to women, and a few more relating to a new vehicle Johnson supposedly obtained during his recruitment period (the link is but one screenshot, and it does contain offensive language).

Johnson’s tweets aren’t uncharacteristic. High schoolers and college freshmen say stupid things. But until recently, they haven’t been said so publicly, which tends to become a problem when that everyday high schooler/freshman suddenly becomes a person of public interest.

His tweets are also part of a greater unfortunate trend among black Twitter users. Patrice J. Williams wrote a thoughtful article in January about the habits of the disproportionately large number of African-Americans on Twitter. She observes how “Black Twitter” serves to reinforce negative stereotypes about the community as a whole – and especially black youth. Johnson bears the weight, however misappropriated, of adding to that regrettable portrayal.

Johnson closed his Twitter account shortly after the story broke (he deactivated his Facebook account months earlier after getting into a public dispute with Mississippi State fans). Cleveland suggests that the potential star football player go further than that – to consider all of his words as just the type of public statements they now are, and to, perhaps a little sooner than the typical incoming college freshman, grow up.


See something in the news that you think is Clickworthy? Email Dylan.

Wallace/Stewart interview fallout good for media discourse

Many months ago, in November 2010, Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace visited the set of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart to talk with Stewart, inevitably, about the perception of bias in Fox News programming. Wallace continually asked Stewart to come on his Fox program.

Last Sunday, Stewart finally obliged. Again the talks took a turn toward bias in the media, and at Fox in particular – this time, on Wallace’s home turf.

(Click on the annotation for part 2)

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Going ‘Gaga’ for 99 cent album – Amazon’s cloud service promotion

Her music is shallow. A Madonna acolyte who thrives on controversy and shock factor, muffled beneath layers of techno beat. Her stage name is even obnoxious.

So, when I purchased Lady Gaga’s new album, Born This Way, on Amazon, I felt dirty. Like a wine connoisseur who grabbed an oversized juice box off the shelf at Walgreens because it was free with the purchase of a tube of toothpaste. I placed a notepad over the Mae album on my desk. It didn’t need to see this. I hesitantly clicked the purchase button. Then I wondered…

Is there any album I wouldn’t buy for 99 cents?

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